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CTM

What is a CTM?


A clinical trial manager is responsible for directing the process of clinical trials by employing effective organizational strategies and reviewing the results using rigorous clinical procedures.


Clinical Trial Managers execute and supervise clinical trials, and oversee and guide Clinical Research Associates (CRA) and Clinical Data Managers (CDM). A Clinical Trial Manager reports to a Clinical Project Manager (CPM).

The Clinical Trial Manager program is designed for those who who are interested in transitioning to working as a Clinical Trial Manager. The CTM position does not require travel and is a fully remote postion.


The CTM training course is led by tenured Clinical Trial Managers that have worked for a few of the top CRO's and Sponsors in the United States. Most companies require clinical trial managers (CTM) to have at least a bachelor’s degree in a science, engineering, or mathematical field. To obtain a bachelor’s, most individuals enroll in a four-year college or university and take courses in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, statistics, writing, and genetics. For some clinical trials, a master’s degree and a supervisory background are required. Clinical trial managers usually receive some on-the-job training from more experienced employees.



 

Clinical Trial Managers can earn over $130,000 per year.


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How is the Job Market and Salary for Clinical Trial Managers?

The salaries of clinical trial managers largely depend on their place of employment and years of experience. However, in the United States, clinical trial managers earn an annual median salary of $145,220. Clinical trial managers in the top 10 percent earn more than $165,006 annually, while those in the 10th percentile earn less than $104,856 annually. Individuals in this profession typically have access to employment benefits such as health insurance, retirement, paid time off, and bonuses based on longevity and performance.


The employment rate for clinical trial managers is expected to grow by 17 percent between 2014 and 2024. This rate is much higher than the national average of 7 percent for all professionals, and the increase is attributed to the growth of the pharmaceutical, medical, and private research sectors.

AM I QUALIFIED?


Most companies require clinical trial managers to have at least a bachelor’s degree in a science, engineering, or mathematical field. To obtain a bachelor’s, most individuals enroll in a four-year college or university and take courses in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, statistics, writing, and genetics. For some clinical trials, a master’s degree and a supervisory background are required. Clinical trial managers usually receive some on-the-job training from more experienced employees.

CTM Essential Duties?

Clinical trial managers’ regular tasks depend on factors such as the size of their employer, the type of trial they are managing, and their position within the company. Despite these factors, most clinical trial managers usually perform the following tasks:


Manage Clinical Trials

Managing clinical trials for private physicians, drug companies, government agencies, and academic institutions is a major part of a clinical trial manager’s job. They oversee trials, ensuring they are executed correctly and follow the correct protocol. They might report issues or problems to a physician or director in charge of the trial. 


Recruit Participants (Study Subjects)

Every clinical trial needs willing participants. Often, for scientific and research purposes, participants must meet certain criteria before they are selected. Clinical trial managers often help screen potential study subjects and provide them with information before the actual trial. 


Monitor Trial Progress

When conducting a study, it is important to keep track of every development. Clinical trial managers are usually responsible for monitoring the progress of study subjects and the overall trial. They are often given certain diagnostic tools to ensure the trial is progressing as planned. 


Contact Supervisors or Scientists

Clinical trial managers often have close ties with the scientists and physicians responsible for the trial. They are expected to update these individuals and provide them with important details regarding the trials. Clinical trial managers may have regular meetings with scientists, researchers, or physicians. 


Collect Data

Many clinical trials require interviews with study subjects. The questions asked during these interviews are highly important and can have a major impact on the outcome of the study. Clinical trial managers are often tasked with collecting data from study subjects and presenting it to the appropriate party.